Conduent Healthy Communities Institute

Related Content in Search

Note that the special characters described below are generally disabled in our site searches, with the exception of using double quotes (") to group phrases.

When displaying related content for an item (e.g. a promising practice), we use the related content keywords assigned to that item to do a keyword search for relevant content to display in the related content section. Every item (promising practices, indicators, etc) have topics that can be assigned to them. This is the only time the related content keywords are used. They are not matched against when searching for an item. If no related content keywords are specified, the keywords associated with the topics assigned to the item will be used instead. Results in the related content sections are ordered by relevance.

For example, say you are viewing the details page of the "Partners in Reading" promising practice, which has these related content keywords assigned to it: literacy, reading. The system will search for related indicators, resources, etc. using those two keywords. That is, it will search for resources that have the words literacy or reading in their title, author, description, topics, location, or keywords field. The search does not include the resources' related content keywords.

There are some special characters that can be added to the related content keywords to affect results and ranking.

Special Characters Description

"

A phrase that is enclosed within double quote (") characters matches only records that contain the phrase literally, as it was typed. For example, "test phrase" does not match "test, phrase". You should always enclose multiple word keyword terms in double quotes.

+

A leading plus sign indicates that this word must be present in each record that is returned.

-

A leading minus sign indicates that this word is excluded from the search.

><

These two special characters are used to change a word's ranking in the search results. The > moves it higher on the search results list and the < lowers it.

 ~

A leading tilde lowers the ranking of the word from the search results, lower than <, but doesn't omit the word such as when using -. This special character can be useful if you want to move a particular item down in the list of ranked results.

The asterisk turns words into a wildcard word or phrase. Unlike the other characters, it should be appended to the word to be affected. If the asterisk is included before the word, the search will include words that end with that word. If the asterisk is included after the word, the search will include words that start with that word.

 ( )

Parentheses group words into multiple choices of phrases.

 

Examples

The following examples demonstrate the keyword modifiers described above:

  • Find records that contain at least one of the two words:
    apple, banana
  • Find records that contain the phrase "apple pie":
    "apple pie"
  •  Only finds records that contain both words. If a record contains only one of the terms (i.e. "apple" but not "juice") it is not returned:
    +apple, +juice
  • Find records that contain the word "apple", but rank records higher if they also contain "macintosh":
    +apple, macintosh
  • Find records that contain the word "apple" but not "macintosh":
    +apple, -macintosh
  • Find records that contain the word "apple", but if the record also contains the word "macintosh", rate it lower than if record does not. This is "softer" than a search for '+apple -macintosh', for which the presence of "macintosh" causes the record not to be returned at all:
    +apple, ~macintosh
  • Find records that contain the words "apple" and "turnover", or "apple" and "strudel" (in any order):
    +apple, +(turnover strudel)
  • Find records that contain the words "apple" and "turnover", or "apple" and "strudel" (in any order), but rank "apple turnover" higher than "apple strudel":
    +apple, +(>turnover <strudel)
  • Find records that contain words such as "apple", "apples", "applesauce", or "applet":
    apple*
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